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I’ve had a cold for a month what is going on?

So it’s probably been just under a month, and it started out as a cough (which I’ve still got but I went to the doctors and they said mild asthma which is odd because I’ve never before had any signs of asthma) anyway, I’ve had this cold and it has no signs of getting better, and one point it seemed to be okay but then it got worse and same again. It’s really old. And I know an average cold/cough lasts about a week but mine normally lasts about 2 weeks never this long. Help?

This question was not answered by a nutritionist, however another user commented.

Answer:

Most uncomplicated colds last between eight and nine days, but about 25 percent last two weeks, and five to 10 percent last three weeks. Even the most stubborn colds will typically resolve in a few weeks’ time; this is actually one of the ways you can distinguish a cold from allergies. A cold will last, at most, a few weeks, but allergy symptoms can last all season.

rattling in chest and a lot of coughing?

I worked with a girl who had bronchitis a week later I started coughing. I went to the doctors and they did no test or anything on me after I told them about my co-worker with bronchitis they told me I had that but then told me I have a sinus infection.(no test was given.) so a month passes and I still have this cough with a rattling chest, sometimes mucus comes up but lately it’s hard for me to even cough hard. so can someone please help me out and tell me what I have!? also my ribs hurt from coughing so much

This question was not answered by a nutritionist, however another user commented.

Answer:

I had the same thing. I have had pneumonia before and know what it feels like. I had the same symptoms as you have starting early June and just ended about 2 weeks ago. I went to the doc and told them that I was convinced it was pneumonia but they tossed that aside and told me I had asthma. So they prescribed me an inhaler which helped me for a couple of weeks and then stopped working., I went back and they gave me a steroid inhaler. After still no progress they upped the dosage and refilled my prescription. It got a little better but not much. After a month or so they gave my azithromyacin (spell check?) Which is take 2 pills on day one and 1 pill for 4 more days. This is what I believe helped me the most. It did definitely help the first time I had pneumonia. Next time you visit the doctor ask for azithromyacin and tell them you heard it helps. They might not prescribe it to you if they don’t think you have the right symptoms (It is an antibiotic so it is strong) I don’t know what else to say… Hope you feel better soon. ~bob~

How long should you be on steriods for asthma?

I’ve been on steroids for my asthma for 7 years. I feel a little bit better than before I was on them but ive gain a lot of weight. Am I on it for too long? My doctor says no. I also asked my doctor about other options and she said there were no other options.

This question was not answered by a nutritionist, however another user commented.

Answer:

One of the main side effects of steroids is weight gain. Your doctor most likely has you on steroids because he feels your asthma cannot be adequately controlled with an inhaler alone. If you are concerned about the side effects you’re experiencing, I encourage you to talk with your doctor about other treatment options for your asthma.

I play when i have asthma?

i play basketball when i have asthma when i play the asthma triggers… how can I atleast stop it when im playing pls.. help!

This question was not answered by a nutritionist, however another user commented.

Answer:

Short answer: Gradually build up intensity don’t go too hard too soon. Control your breathing, breathe through your nose and be careful not to overbreathe. Long answer: Most Asthmatics will not have sufficient levels of carbon dioxide in their lungs to handle very long exerting themselves. Their carbon dioxide levels will be very low to begin and once the levels further develop from heavy breathing shortly after commencement of exercise, the body immediately switches on the defence mechanism that is asthma (exercise induced asthma to be more precise). If you can get past this stage, your body will start to produce and store the required amounts of carbon dioxide and consequently this will open and keep your airways open because carbon dioxide acts as your body’s natural asthma inhaler. This is often referred to by athletes as the “Second Wind”. This is when approx. 10 or 15 minutes after commencement of exercise, the body starts to produce and store enough carbon dioxide to re-open airways and you can breathe much easier. You can exercise or exert yourself much harder without becoming breathless. Here are a few suggestions on how to avoid exercise induced asthma. I suffered from asthma everytime I used to exercise for a long time before I mastered the following techniques. These techniques are based on real science and I would highly recommend them to anybody else who suffers from asthma when playing sport or exercising whether its basketball, football, soccer, tennis, karate or jump rope, it doesn’t matter these techniques work. Before Excercising: Do a few controlled breath holds this will build up your carbon dioxide levels. Simply hold your breath for as long as you can comfortably without gasping for breath at the end. Ensure you can hold your breath comfortably for at least 15 seconds. If you can’t its not recommended to start exercising intensively until you can, by doing some more controlled breath holds or by walking for 15 minutes and then resting for a few minutes before attempting another controlled breath hold. Warm up your lungs like you warm up other muscles Gradually build up intensity. Start off slowly, the time when most asthmatics will find themselves beginning to have difficulty breathing is shortly after commencement of exercise. Exertion before the body has a chance to build up carbon dioxide levels is not a good idea. You want to try and get that second wind during your warm up whilst you are gradually increasing intensity, you don’t want to be having a full blown attack because you started out with high intensity before your body was producing the required carbon dioxide. Especially if it’s during competitive sport. Before starting out the first thing to do is to check that you are breathing through your nose. Start out with low intensity such as walking slowly, gradually increasing the pace whilst maintaining control of your breathing keeping it as shallow as possible. Ensure that your mouth is closed, this is crucial during exercise because your natural instinct will be to mouth breathe. If you feel yourself becoming out of breath or finding it hard to maintain nasal breathing, stop immediately, sit down, stand still or walk around slowly. Focus on bringing your breathing back under control in and out only through your nose. When Excercising: Breathe through your nose (If you feel the need to breathe through your mouth then you should stop, until you can return to nasal breathing). Never allow your breathing to become out of control. Do not try to increase your breathing rate, but do the opposite and try and slow it down. If you follow these simple guidelines or rules you will not have to worry about playing sport or exercising and having asthmatic symptoms. When you master these rules and are an accomplished nasal and shallow breather, you will enjoy many other health benefits along with being asthma free. These Benefits Include: Increased oxygenation at the cellular level, resulting in better performance both mentally and physically, stronger endurance and speedier recovery time. Minimize lactic acid build up. Minimize dehydration by eliminating mouth breathing which causes excess water loss. More open and relaxed airways as your carbon dioxide levels are optimized. Increased stamina and general fitness. Increased metabolism Optimized blood pH levels

Sick with asthma compared to being sick without asthma?

kk so I have a cold right now, and am coughing a lot, but don’t have asthma. I was coughing a lot, and said I hated being sick and that my chest hurt from coughing so much. Then, my fiend who has asthma said that was nothing compared to when she gets sick cuz of her asthma? I’m just wondering what the differences are between having a cold with asthma versus without asthma. What’s different? Like does it last longer, affect your breathing? Is the cough worse?

This question was not answered by a nutritionist, however another user commented.

Answer:

difference-with a cold you feel like you cant breath -with asthma you CAN”T breath. A cold won’t kill you-asthma can kill you

Does stress make your asthma worse? ?

Please, only answers from people with asthma. Do you believe that stress can trigger asthma. Or why do some people feel less asthma during stress….any theories? Well, I don’t know who is giving the thumbs down but doesn’t seem to be a reason. I just wanted opinions. How can opinions be wrong. Sometimes I get LESS asthma during stress. I wondered if it has something to do with adrenalin. .

This question was not answered by a nutritionist, however another user commented.

Answer:

I’ve been wondering the same thing. I also have asthma, but I’ve never really experienced that only a couple times.

How Do You Know If You Still Have Asthma?

I really don’t know how to define asthma. I stopped having asthma SYMPTOMS and stopped using medication 2 years ago. I was 13 then. I am 15 now. Can I still have asthma, while I don’t use medication and don’t have any symptoms? My pulmonary function test was 94%. Wait, do I still have asthma since, after my doctor gave me Albuterol, I got over 100%?

This question was not answered by a nutritionist, however another user commented.

Answer:

Asthma is quite variable in its course through life. Since it is so variable, the naming of asthma is broken down into subgroups that describe it. It sounds like you definitely had asthma when you were 13, but as is often the case, you can grow out of it. Your pulmonary function test is normal, and you had some further improvement with albuterol. This link describes all the subgroupings and management of asthma: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/asthma/asthgdln.htm For more severe asthma, we need to note the severity, control, and responsiveness to treatment. Your asthma, though, would probably fall under the category of “intermittent asthma”, because it’s possible that if you were to get a severe cold, your asthma might flare up a little bit. There is a debate about when you can say “I no longer have asthma”, and the line is not clearly drawn. If you haven’t touched an albuterol inhaler in 2 years, it seems like you could tell people: “I had asthma up until around age 13, but haven’t needed medication since.” For the purposes of a medical history, you could probably put on a medical release form that you have asthma, but it’s intermittent and very well-controlled. Presently, you could deem yourself asthma-free. However, you will always be more likely than others to have reactive lungs in your lifetime.

Any home remedies for Asthma attacks?

I’m at work having some asthma trouble and I do not have an inhalor with me. Anybody have any suggestions?

This question was not answered by a nutritionist, however another user commented.

Answer:

Here’s a place where you can find plenty of such remedies: http://www.asthmainformationguide.com/natural-herbal-remedies-for-asthma Just too lazy to cut-paste them 🙂